Author’s Journey #1 – Does Writing a book make sense for you?

by Roger Parker on December 15, 2009

Roger-Step1-PlanI’d like to invite you along on an author’s journey towards writing a nonfiction book. During the next 26 weeks, I’m going to share my progress towards my 39th book. I want to share with you some of the strategies and tips I’ve learned about book publishing and personal branding. I also want to share some of the changes that have taken place in publishing, as well as share the steps in the decision-making process that can save you time and help you avoid expensive mistakes.

Why do business professionals like you write books?

Certainly, it’s not the “big bucks” advances from conventional trade publishers. Celebrity 6 and 7-figure advances notwithstanding, direct income from book sales is likely not to become a significant income source for you and your family.

And, unless you self-publish, which requires you to spend money before you can earn money–you’re unlikely to profit from endless streams of recurring income from book royalties each month.

So, why do business professionals write books, if it’s not the money?

There are two ways to answer this question: the anecdotal approach and the statistical, research study approach:

  1. Post-1-MLevy-42Rules-TWO-5Anecdotal approach. The easiest and most readable way to learn why busy professionals write books is to pick up a copy of Mitchell Levy’s 42 Rules for Driving Success with Books. The 5 sections of this book provide concise, entertaining, and revealing real-world portraits of authors who have escaped the economic hell of anonymity by writing a book that positioned them as experts in their field. If you’re looking for believable role models of publishing success, this is the place to start at a very reasonable price.
  2. Post-1-RainToday_Rprt-TWO-5Research-study approach. RainToday, the research and publishing arm of the Wellesley Hills Group, has published a detailed, 2-volume, 300-page Business Book Publishing Series Report. Based on detailed interviews and surveys with published authors, these reports make a dollars and cents argument for writing and publishing a book to build your brand and attract qualified prospects.

The most telling statistic: 96% of authors reported that publishing a business book affected their practice either “Positively” or “Extremely Positively!”

So, why am I, again, beginning an author’s journey?

My last book, Design to Sell, came out in 2006, and my previous book, The Streetwise Guide to Relationship Marketing on the Internet, came out in 2000. My previous books sold over 1.6 million copies throughout the world. (My shelves are loaded with copies of my books I’ll never be able to read, i.e., Chinese, Polish, Russian, and Hebrew editions.)

My best-selling books came earlier, when it was easier to earn significant incomes from publisher’s advances and royalties on book sales. My first NY Times best-seller was Looking Good in Print: A Guide to Basic Design for Desktop Publishing, and the late 1990’s were subsidized by significant royalties from Microsoft Office for Windows 97 For Dummies, and others in the series.

Now, it’s time to write again, and there are several factors driving my decision. The relative importance of the following varies from day to day, but all of the following play a role:

  • Writing is fun. Isn’t that a crazy thing to say? Yet, it’s true. At the end of the day, there’s satisfaction to be found in whatever you’ve been able to accomplish. There’s a lot to be said for starting with nothing, and ending up with a page or two of convincing arguments that didn’t exist at the start of your writing session.
  • Repositioning my expertise. For many years, I was known as the “design guru of our generation who has taught desktop publishing excellence to hundreds of thousands,” as Ralph Wilson said. I continue to love graphic design, but at the present time, I’m more interested in teaching writing skills at Published&Profitable and writing about writing in my daily writing tips blog. The time is right for me to write a book about publishing that will attract more qualified traffic to my website and more invitations to speak.
  • Passion. I’m not only very passionate about the topic, I want to learn more about it and be able to teach it more effectively. Writing is the best way to enhance your understanding and ability to communicate it to others.
  • It’s a different world. There are some wonderful changes taking place in publishing these days. New tools are available that open up new frontier of opportunity for authors who are willing to adapt to the times. Never before have the barriers to entry been as open to entrepreneurial authors as they are now. I’m tired of writing about these changes, I want to take advantage of them myself!

I’m tired of writing about these changes, I want to take advantage of them myself!

I’m looking forward to putting today’s new writing and marketing tools to work writing and promoting a different type of book, one that only now makes sense for business professionals.

My new book also provides an opportunity for me to synthesize marketing and writing in ways that were impossible for most business professionals in 2000, and were only known to a few non-computing professionals in 2006.

I hope you’ll come along for the remaining 25 installments of this author’s journey; and, if you’re so inclined, I hope you’ll become convinced that it’s time for you, too, to begin an author’s journey.

In the second installment of this series, I’m going to address the first question you should ask yourself when writing a book: Who Do You Want to Read Your Book? The answer may surprise you.

Note: Drop me a line at Roger@publishedandprofitable.com and I’ll send you a PDF of the mind map I’ve created for my author’s journey plus a mind map of the contents of my next book!

rcp-heming-picRoger C. Parker helps others write books that build brands. He’s written over 30 books, offers do-it-yourself resources at Published & Profitable, and shares writing tips each weekday. His latest book is Title Tweet! 140 Bite-Sized Ideas for Article, Book, and Event Titles
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  • http://www.style-blog.net/ Mimi

    wow this blog is super interesting, thanks for all your work writing this down!

  • Bill Pearsall

    This is a great series and a great way to give back. Kudos to you my friend.

    Academics have often been found near death and gasping for an infusion of publish-ability. For some, relief would arrive in the form of a rare bird. For others, relief would never come and they would parish running to teach a class from a distant off campus parking space.

    Business people have no such pressure.

    Having personally written seven business books, well I’ve rewritten the same book seven times; I can say I have no pressure to ever publish other than it would be cool. However I can certainly see the business career benefits of being published. Even back in the 80s I would gain a leg up by just telling people I was in the process of typing a “how to”. In the 90s I would tell them I was keyboarding.

    At your suggestion Mitchell Levy was very kind and generous to send me his 42 rules.

    I do feel that modern publishing should adopt the “less is more” principal and 42 rules is a great example. Small capsules of adoptable insight succinctly presented.

    Therefore with your guidance, past and present I will move forward and touch screen my latest and final rendition of “Business Success through Pretence and Ostentation.”

    Best regards,

    Bill Pearsall

  • Bill Pearsall

    This is a great series and a great way to give back. Kudos to you my friend.

    Academics have often been found near death and gasping for an infusion of publish-ability. For some, relief would arrive in the form of a rare bird. For others, relief would never come and they would parish running to teach a class from a distant off campus parking space.

    Business people have no such pressure.

    Having personally written seven business books, well I’ve rewritten the same book seven times; I can say I have no pressure to ever publish other than it would be cool. However I can certainly see the business career benefits of being published. Even back in the 80s I would gain a leg up by just telling people I was in the process of typing a “how to”. In the 90s I would tell them I was keyboarding.

    At your suggestion Mitchell Levy was very kind and generous to send me his 42 rules.

    I do feel that modern publishing should adopt the “less is more” principal and 42 rules is a great example. Small capsules of adoptable insight succinctly presented.

    Therefore with your guidance, past and present I will move forward and touch screen my latest and final rendition of “Business Success through Pretence and Ostentation.”

    Best regards,

    Bill Pearsall

  • http://www.filecabinetkey.net/lund-key-cabinet lund key cabinet

    I’ll
    back again for sure, thanks for great article :D
     

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