Posts in ‘Social Media’

Week In Review: Oct 24 – Oct 30, 2010

by Magesh Tarala on October 31, 2010

3 Ways to Save money and Increase Productivity

by Matthew Carmen, Oct 25, 2010

Save money and increase productivity need not be an oxymoron, especially in the IT department. But if that strategy starts with cutting the labor force, it will be detrimental to the company. Matthew suggests several ways to achieve these seemingly conflicting goals and some of them may be applicable to your situation. more…

Chaos and Complexity #7: Black swans, Randomness and your Career

by Gary Monti, Oct 26, 2010

If you believe in sustained stable outcome in complex situations, you will be doomed. Chaotic systems (like our life and career) have deterministic, interrelated rules producing nonlinear, unpredictable results. In order to be successful in your career, you need to practice a form of cognitive dissonance and learn to carry two streams of thought simultaneously : What is the best outcome and what is the worst outcome. more…

Social Media and Tribes #18: Better than Google

by Deepika Bajaj, Oct 27, 2010

Every tool has its purpose and each tool has its strengths and weaknesses. Once you get accustomed to using a tool, the tendency could be to to use it for purposes it is not effective for. Google is great when you need information, but it may not relate to your situation. That’s where your friends can come to your aid on Facebook! more…

Flexible Focus #25: Assessing your situation with a Mandala SWOT analysis

by William Reed, Oct 28, 2010

The SWOT Analysis model is originally attributed to Albert Humphrey from his work at Stanford University in the 1960s and 1970s. This gives you more clarity, but risks leading to 2-dimensional or checklist thinking. A better way to go beyond is to use a Mandala Chart. You can start by using the downloadable A-frame Mandala SWOT Chart. more…

Cloud: A truly nebulous term

by Marc Watley, Oct 29, 2010

The term “cloud” is one of the most over-used technology terms in recent times. We have been using the so called “cloud” for a long time. Think about Yahoo!, Hotmail, Gmail, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc. So what exactly is the meaning we are trying to convey when we use “cloud”? The answer is simply “on-demand”. more…

Social Media and Tribes#18: Better than Google

by Deepika Bajaj on October 27, 2010

You may be wondering what is better than Google? Indeed a fair question. This is how I use Google. I get a question in my mind and I type the question on the search bar. Then I click “search” in pursuit of my answer. It is a good way to get information of topics and things that you are interested in.

But what happens if you want real-time customer reviews, insights and recommendations from your tribe.

This is when I use “Facebook”. I type a question on my profile status and seek answers from my network…and they all collectively help me get to the answer.

Here is an example: While in Delhi, I wanted to get recommendation on where to get info on movie reviews and showtimes. I simply reached out to my network on facebook.

My FB Conversation

I got responses within a couple of hours. In the meantime, I was on a conference call. And had the help of my friends plan a movie date with my grandmother. So, instead of me working alone, I had a group of friends who helped me get to what I was looking for. This is the raw power of leverage that Facebook Tribe offers.

Why it is better than Google?

  1. Not alone anymore: Man is a social animal and now inhabits the social networking cyber-safari. Why do things alone when it is more fun to do things with others? So, Google might be full of information but you need to dig into it alone. Instead it is the collective leverage that adds a tinge of FUN and that ever-so-important human element to the mix.
  2. Sharing is caring: Getting information is like hoarding things for yourself. When people share on FB others who might be in the conversation also get others update. This sharing and caring makes the world go around.
  3. A virtual BOND: People who are on the social networks actually broadcast info to their tribe about what they are doing. And in this process they give and receive information which leads to a virtual bonding within the tribe. Sometimes, people who have only communicated online meet in person and they are no strangers to each others. Now that is some virtual bond.

A constant contact, a constant reach and constant care makes search on FB sometimes better than Google…

Week In Review: Oct 17 – Oct 23, 2010

by Magesh Tarala on October 24, 2010

Project Leadership #2: Keep Relentless Planning Going (RPG) on your projects!

by Himanshu Jhamb, Oct 18, 2010

Planning is not an one time task. It’s a continuous activity through out the life of the project. You can come up with any number of reasons why you don’t need a project plan for your current project. But there are many overwhelming reasons why you need one. And, by the way, don’t forget Mr. Change.  more…

Chaos and Complexity #6: A Checklist that works!

by Gary Monti, Oct 19, 2010

When you are dropped into a situation, how do you figure out if the situation is complex and if so, what the level of complexity is. In this article, Gary provides a comprehensive checklist that will enable you to ask the right questions to gauge the level of complexity. more…

Social Media and Tribes #17: SMSing 2.0 – Mobile in India

by Deepika Bajaj, Oct 20, 2010

SMS (Texting) is huge in India. In fact it may be more widely used in India than any other country. It is used for everything ranging from hiring domestic help to connecting with family to voting in the “Indian Idol”. The cultural aspect that makes it possible is the because people are more trusting and are comfortable sharing their phone number. more…

Flexible Focus #24: The sky is not empty

by William Reed, Oct 21, 2010

Do you have the ability to see space or emptiness? In Western culture, emptiness means nothingness or void. But in oriental culture, it is an integral concept of art and life. Once you realize space is not empty, the Mandala Chart LOOKING AT SPACE can help you recognize its potential. more…

Why Talent Management should be a priority for entrepreneurs

by Sean Conrad, Oct 22, 2010

As entrepreneurs, we’re all focused on the success of our business. By ensuring our companies adopt talent management best-practices right from the start, we set our employees and our business up for success. more…

I was presently surprised on how text messaging is more popular in India than any other place I am aware of. Most of the business and family communication which had been previously a telephone call has become a text message. This is a great leap into Mobile 2.0 in India. It is common to set business meetings over a text message. Coordinate with family about your whereabouts, get movie coupons and change ringtones on your cell phone over an SMS.

Interestingly, there are sites like smsgupshup.com that boasts 25M users. Looking for domestic help (very common) in India, check out babajob.com, a SMS based social networking site for household help. Imagine! hiring a cook, a driver and many other things over SMS.

Some interesting observations:

  1. SMS NOT text message: Most people are familiar with the word “SMS”, say text me and they know you are from “OUT of town”.
  2. OK to text: For most part when the phone rings in meetings, people hold the handset close to their mouth to have a conversation in a conference room but the most widely acceptable format to communicate in such a setting is TEXTING.
  3. Traffic makes it a necessity: Imagine! being stuck in a traffic jam in a big city like Mumbai and Delhi. You need help with directions, you will request a text message with landmarks to identify a location e.g “behind the videocon building, look for the PVR cinema on the right OR make a left Raheja towers”. Almost a small personal navigation system.
  4. Text for voting: India is big into “Indian Idol” and programs where the community needs to vote to pick a winner. This adds more fuel to the SMSing community who take this responsibility seriously to caste their vote.

I loved how many things I used to SMS for while in India. The most important fact is the cultural aspect – where giving your phone number is not a BIG deal. People are comfortable sharing this information and are more trusting in this regard than the western cultures where email is more popular. I enjoyed the personalization of SMSing…

Week In Review: Oct 10 – Oct 16, 2010

by Magesh Tarala on October 17, 2010

Developing your financial management talent

by Brian Superczynski, Oct 11, 2010

IT financial management has not evolved into a discipline with its own academic programs and certifications. In addition to learning on the job and tailoring programs for your organization, ITIL and PMI courses/certifications will help. But the first step is to recognize this as a  unique area that needs to be developed in your organization. more…

Chaos and Complexity #5: Chaos vs. Complexity

by Gary Monti, Oct 12, 2010

When patterns emerge in chaotic environment, adaptation happens. This is called complex adaptive behavior. This is driven by self organization. The hallmark of emergent, complex adaptive behavior is it brings about a change from the starting point that is not just different in degree by in kind. more…

Social Media and Tribes #16: LinkedIn gets a local makeover in India!

by Deepika Bajaj, Oct 13, 2010

India’s economy is growing by leaps and bounds and it’s professional class is utilizing social media to keep up. Brijj is the local equivalent of LinkedIn, but it has some local twists. more…

Flexible Focus #23: Manners make the man

by William Reed, Oct 14, 2010

Some of the Japanese traditions from the Edo period are still relevant. It shows how to live with respect, culture and style. In this article William has a short list of some key aspects of the Edo manners. You can also download the EDO SHIGUSA MANDALA to start integrating Edo Manners in your life. more…

Worry and Anxiety – Can we really overcome them?

by Vijay Peduru, Oct 15, 2010

We worry about a lot of things. But if you carefully analyze those worries, you will realize that more than 90% of them are needless. Worries only lead to bad situations like relationship problems are health issues. Overcome your worries by understanding that worries are stories we invent about a future situation. These stories will more than likely never happen. On a positive note, invent a good future situation and deliberately think about the good things that will happen in the future. more…

Interesting to be in India when they are venturing into how to use social media for tribes that have similar interests. As the social media momentum takes off, it is clear that tribes will mature in the coming year. Specifically, professional tribes in India. Since the entire nation is upbeat with the economic growth – it allows for professionals to feel they are treasured and wanted. What better feeling for a graduate coming out of school or for a professional looking for another interesting challenge!

I was in Mumbai last week for some business meetings and it was interesting to note that India talks on SMS/text messaging more than on email. Unfortunately, I have a handset where it was challenging to text but I had no other alternative. Even people at Executive levels pass on their mobile numbers and will text you if they need to connect with you. Quite an interesting shift for me.

Here is professional tribe in India that is a LinkedIn local maker : Brijj

Some interesting observations:

  1. No job search: Though this is a professional network, it does not have its own job search function, it partnered with Naukri.com for that functionality. Therefore, it is a professional network minus its own job search as seen in LinkedIn.
  2. Import contacts from LinkedIn: You can invite your contacts from LinkedIn to connect with you on Brijj. I am wondering when LinkedIn will allow local professional sites to import contacts to it. 
  3. Featured Experts: They have a section where they have “Featured Experts”. I found this quite interesting as I was not able to determine the criteria of how a Featured Expert is chosen. I looked for their contributions as in articles etc. but could not locate any. I do believe people get a lot of clicks on their profiles so makes sense for someone who wants to establish a Thought Leader persona.

… and of course they want you to KEEP BRIJJING...which is I guess like keep Googling…Interesting to find how local versions are existing inspite of the success of mega networks like LinkedIn.

I am loving the time I am spending in Delhi. Last week, I was in a meeting where I learnt about a site for foodies in India. A very fast growing segments of India’s exploding consumer market. I have to say, everyone in consumer business wants a piece of it. Add to it a a dash of entertainment (like movie reviews) and dash of Common Wealth games (restaurant specials) and you are looking at a tribe that is HUGE.

Lets back up for a second and let me build the picture for you. Delhi is a capital of foodies, a tribe that socializes, talks, breathes, worship’s and lives food. In this world, I was curious to find a site that really is like what we call Yelp in US. I knew that it is next to impossible that there wasn’t any such foody tribe in this part of the world. So, the mystery unveiled and I got to learn about Burrp

Here are some distinctions between the Foody tribe in US and Foody tribe in India:

  • Bollywood Prevails: In India, Bollywood is connected to everything. There is a section on the site “Flicks this week“, that links you to show times, buy tickets and write a review. This is definitely a cool strategy where a tribe views entertainment as part of their daily eating habits.
  • Roadside stalls: In India, many people like to explore dhabas which are called Roadside stalls (dhaba) for food. Many of these stalls have had their name to fame by serving mindblowing concoctions of food and recipes. Though the elite might consider this unhygienic food but you really can’t take out a DHABA from an Indian. So, roadside stalls find a spot at this foody tribe and has many hidden gems for the adventurous foodies.
  • Blah section: Then, there is the Blah section…now when you don’t know what you are talking about you need a blah section for people who don’t know what they are looking for. So, the site has travel tips, discount deals and many things that get under the blah section…so if you are foody and wanted to get a food related info but now don’t remember why you were here in the first place – don’t suffer – there is a BLAH section that will blow your mind away and get you thinking of things that you were not thinking of – perfect for a tribe that ties food to travel, movies and beauty…

So, this foody tribe is connecting with food and many things that derive the same sense of satisfaction like a good meal for its members whose universe is centered around their palate. What a foodyful experience….

Week In Review: Sep 26 – Oct 2, 2010

by Magesh Tarala on October 3, 2010

Doing what is Right Vs. Being the Best

by Brian Beedle, Sep 27, 2010

Is it good enough to do the right thing? Certainly not. We as individuals and companies should constantly strive to be the best in our fields. This is necessary to survive in the highly competitive times we live in. For individuals it takes patient parenting from a young age and mentoring as adults to gain this ability. Companies achieve this via Six-Sigma, ITIL, etc.  more…

Chaos and Complexity #3: Managing Expectations

by Gary Monti, Sep 28, 2010

Project managers out there… this article is for you. When a project encounters a rough spot, the project manager is held accountable. Anybody expecting projects to be smooth and trouble free is living in utopia. But there are certain things which if you do consistently, you can manage such situations gracefully. more…

Social Media and Tribes # 14: Taking Dinosaurs Online

by Deepika Bajaj, Sep 29, 2010

Deepika is not irreverent when she uses dinosaurs as an analogy for our older generation. In fact the opposite is true and it is out of fondness for them. The past few decades has seen tremendous progress in technology and it has been especially tough for the older generation to keep pace with. But still they are a hardy bunch excited to adapt with the times and open up to social media albeit slowly and cautiously. more…

Flexible Focus #21: The 8 frames of life: Finances

by William Reed, Sep 30, 2010

Peter Drucker observed that people who chased money were all utterly miserable, without exception. Money should be part of the plan, a means to an end, not an end in itself. So pick a career in something you love and have some talent in. Then understand how economics is tied to everything else. You can do it if you view it with a flexible focus perspective. William’s Mandala chart can help you do it easier and better. more…

Alternate Sales Partnerships #3: The Sales Contract

by Tina Burke, Oct 1, 2010

Direct sales teams are expensive to maintain. Alternate sales teams do not cost any money up front. But there are challenges with either one. It may be an effective strategy to employ both channels, but there are thing you need to be aware of when you choose this path. more…

Social Media and Tribes #14: Taking Dinosaurs Online

by Deepika Bajaj on September 29, 2010

The outdated image of dinosaurs as maladaptive extinct monsters has led to the word “dinosaur” entering the vernacular to describe anything that is impractically large, slow-moving, obsolete, or bound for extinction. But here I am speaking of them very fondly and respectfully. And who I am talking about is the older generation who finds it extremely hard to navigate online yet they understand that if they need to stay connected to their grand kids or even stay updated they need to understand Facebook and Twitter.

There is a rising community of this tribe which is yearning for knowledge on how to create FB and Twitter profiles, upload pictures, share videos and chat through social media tools. During my current stay in India, I have had the rare privilege of coaching some elders in my family to get online so that they are able to connect with their children who are abroad or even in different cities and are now more accessible online than on mobile phones.

So, here are the challenges of this tribe:

  1. Can’t sit on Laptops for more than 20 minutes: Most of them are not accustomed to working on computers and find it hard to concentrate on laptops for long durations. Some of them get backaches, headaches or even lose attention. This is fascinating for me coming from a world of digital natives, where little kids decipher iPhones like they were simply unwrapping a candy bar and can sit for eons when playing with it!
  2. Privacy issues: The youth is open to connecting to different people and has a very different view on privacy issues than the older generation. The older generation don’t like to comment but are happy to get comments on their FB status. They feel if they comment then the whole world will know what they were communicating to that one person. The youth on the contrary is more worried about reputation management, security issues and intellectual issues like their content and pictures.
  3. Picky and Choosy: They are extremely picky about who will be their friends. They are not comfortable with connecting with friends of friends who they might be faintly acquainted to.
  4. Navigation: How to find friends on FB? No recollection of their friends recent names and even their batch mates. They find it extremely challenging to use tools like yahoo or gmail or friendfinder on FB to find friends. They write notes on simple navigation techniques to avoid forgetting how to do so.

To be fair to them, the last 2 decades have not been easy on them, from a technology standpoint. If the 1970-1990 felt like 40 years of technological advancements packed into 20 years, 1990-2010 almost feels like 80 years with the internet, social media and what not!

All in all, I am super excited about their openness to adapt with the times. There is a momentum in this tribe which is fueled by their inherent curiosity to discover the world of social media…Bravo to these brave souls…!

Week In Review: Sep 19 – Sep 25, 2010

by Magesh Tarala on September 26, 2010

Retaining employees: Structuring a Stock Appreciation Rights program

by Steve Popell, Sep 20, 2010

Stock options have historically played a key role in helping retain key employees. Their attractiveness has taken a considerable hit in the past few years. But a Stock Appreciation Rights (SAR) program can achieve the same purpose with few drawbacks if any. Here is what you need to know to have an intelligent conversation with a professional to implement a SAR program. more…

Chaos and Complexity #2: Fun house mirrors and strange attractors

by Gary Monti, Sep 21, 2010

Strange attractors distort systems. If not addressed they can damage or destroy the system. A good visual metaphor for strange attractors is a fun house mirror. Capitalistic economies thrive because of strange attractors. Something new and different is always coming out. For example, a team can be working well and following project principles when – bang! – a competitor with a new product shows up and changes the game.. more…

Social Media and Tribes #13: Social tribes connecting Youth

by Deepika Bajaj, Sep 22, 2010

Deepika is currently visiting India and witnessing the phenomenal impact of Facebook driven social networking in India’s capital city Delhi. Fueled by ISAC (India Study Abroad Center), students from all over the world come here to study. They become a member of a tribe based on their needs and circumstances, enabled by Facebook. more…

Flexible Focus #20: The Principle of Optimization

by William Reed, Sep 23, 2010

You can deal with a problem or crisis in two ways. First is Plan, Do, Check, Action (PDCA). This is the fire fighting approach. Though not suitable for emergencies, the better approach for most situations is CAPD (Check, Action, Plan, Do). This method focuses on understanding the root cause and so will help create long lasting solutions. Flexible Focus enables this and Mandala Chart facilitates flexible thinking. more…

Alternate Sales Partnerships #2: Ways to keep a healthy sales relationship

by Tina Burke, Sep 24, 2010

Tina’s company has had a good partnership with a client. It’s been a fairly stable environment with the same key players in place, good commissions and together they had great clients. Everybody was happy. But still, going into the sales convention, they are welcomed by the new VP of Channel Sales introducing a new program. And that’s because the past program was unsustainable. Who would have known? Stay tuned for next week’s installment from Tina to find out what happened. more…