Posts Tagged ‘hard work’

Working Hard – Still no progress?

by Vijay Peduru on August 18, 2010

We all work hard but don’t seem to make much progress. In a lot of organizations, people seem to be praised high for working long and hard, but they never seem to get promoted or get noticed. Why is this. It is because the definition of “hard work” changed. A lot of people still believe in the industrial age definition that hard work is using your “body” to work hard , but if we look at our current situation, the majority of us do work sitting at a desk in front of a computer.

Many people are not aware that we have transitioned to an information age from an industrial age. According to most economic historians, the Industrial age ended about 20Yrs ago in 1989 when the Berlin wall came down and the internet came up.

In the industrial age, working hard meant, using our body and working long hours i.e physical labor . That is how machines worked and humans had to work similar to machines and humans were rewarded for this.

Now though, the majority of us are not working with machines, we are working with computers using our mind more instead of our body. Now hard work means emotional labor.. exerting our mind. Sure, we still work on long hours and weekends, but this is still not working hard as hard work is still translating into long hours. As Seth Godin says ” Hard work meant more work in the past. But the past doesn’t lead to the future.The future is not about time at all. The future is about work that’s really and truly hard, not time-consuming. It’s about the kind of work that requires us to push ourselves, not just punch the clock. Hard work is where our job security, our financial profit, and our future joy lie.

A lot of successful people work the same hours or less than we work, but they are still successful.  They get ahead because they do the new “hard work” As Seth Godin says

“Hard work is about risk. It begins when you deal with the things that you’d rather not deal with: fear of failure, fear of standing out, fear of rejection. Hard work is about training yourself to leap over this barrier, tunnel under that barrier, drive through the other barrier. And, after you’ve done that, to do it again the next day.”

So, the easiest way to do hard work is to love change,train ourselves to love challenges and question the status quo all by using and exerting our mind.

From now on, let us start training ourselves in baby steps to do the new “Hard work” i.e “exerting emotional labor”.

What can Entrepreneurs learn from Ants?

by Vijay Peduru on July 31, 2009

Hard-Work-Ant

Yes, ants are tiny enough indeed to go unnoticed. However, if we pay close attention and watch them, we find that they possess numerous habits that successful entrepreneurs display. Here are three of them:

#1: Never Quit:

When you place an obstacle in their path, ants will always find another way. They will climb up, down or around to get to where they want to go. This is what an entrepreneur does, as well, when faced with an obstacle. Throughout the startup journey and especially when things do not go well, an entrepreneur overcomes the obstacles and finds a way to keep on going… even if it means redefining the problem, sometimes!  For example, PayPal changed its business model half a dozen times, before the current model became successful. Another example is Flickr, which started as a multiplayer game and ended up as a photo sharing site.

#2: Always look ahead:

Ants gather food in the summer and store for the cold winter months – They plan for known contingencies and are “looking ahead”. Similarly, an entrepreneur’s journey is strewn with problems that they can anticipate ahead of time. Successful entrepreneurs learn to anticipate what can go wrong in the future and prepare for these situations

#3: Do all you can:

Ants never cease to work. They work tirelessly to gather as much food as they can. They are absolutely focused and dedicated to achieving their goals. Entrepreneurs are not very different. They work tirelessly to give shape to their dream. Of course, it’s simply not possible to know the future; the best one can do is do their best and perhaps switch to something else… and do your best at that, if the original one does not work!

This quote from Andy grove, founder of Intel, sums it up well:
“I think it is very important for you to do two things: act on your temporary conviction as if it was a real conviction; and when you realize that you are wrong, correct course very quickly.” —Andy Grove

Special thanks to Jim Rohn, whose teachings inspired me to write this article.

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