Posts Tagged ‘improvement’

Quality #14: Process Improvement and 3E’s

by Tanmay Vora on January 25, 2010

The next installment in the QUALITYtweet series is: Process Improvement and 3E’s

Here are the first thirteen posts, in case you would like to go back and take a look:

  1. Quality #1: Quality is a long term differentiator
  2. Quality #2: Cure Precedes Prevention
  3. Quality #3: Great People + Good Processes = Great Quality
  4. Quality #4: Simplifying Processes
  5. Quality #5: Customers are your “Quality Partners”
  6. Quality #6: Knowing what needs improvement
  7. Quality #7: Productivity and Quality
  8. Quality #8: Best Practices are Contextual
  9. Quality #9: Quality of Relationship and Communication
  10. Quality #10: Inspection can be a waste if…
  11. Quality #11: Driving Change Through Leadership
  12. Quality #12: Middle Management and Quality Culture
  13. Quality #13: Reviews can be fun (if done right)

#QUALITYtweet Lack of 3E’s can be your biggest road blocks

in improvement journey. Empowerment, Education,

and Empathy

There are many reasons why a lot of improvement initiatives fail. However, top three reasons for most of the failures are:

1)      Lack of Empowerment

2)      Lack of Education and Training

3)      Lack of Empathy

Lets carefully look at each one of these culprits, and what you can do about it:

Empowerment

All improvement starts from the top. Most of the top leaders would claim that they want their processes to improve and efficiencies to increase. However, their best intentions to improve processes do not translate into actual commitment to improve. They assign responsibility of process improvement to a group but tend to bypass the processes themselves for short-term benefits. Worst yet, they assign responsibility of process improvement to a team and then reallocate the same team when faced with an immediate need of those resources. Leaders set a wrong precedence when they do this, and often create a culture where bypassing processes is considered normal. Lack of empowerment also means that people are not allowed to make mistakes. As a consequence, people responsible for or interested in process improvement initiative soon lose interest and move on and organization looses substantial time and effort already spent so far.

What can you do about it?

  • Map your intentions with your actions on process improvement.
  • Assign ownership and divert all communication related to improvement at one point.
  • Set expectations clear on goals and purpose of process improvement initiative.
  • Welcome innovation and let your improvement team make mistakes.
  • Announce your process improvement goals and track the progress.
  • Announce the results as well.
  • Periodically review improvement efforts and results.

Education

Either most people are not aware of the best practices or they don’t know how to apply those practices in given situations. Technology folks are deep into technology, but they don’t necessarily go deep into processes and practices. This is where continuous education is required. People need to be trained on processes and best way to implement them. When people don’t know the process, no wonder they will not use it optimally.

What can you do about it?

  • Set up a process training calendar throughout the year.
  • Ensure that all new processes, practices are propagated across the organization.
  • Set up a process advisory function for current/new projects.
  • Create best practices group and empower them to explore/share their expertise.
  • Have right knowledge management tools that help you in spreading process awareness.

Empathy

Process improvement can only be effective when process has an “empathy” element into it. If applied rigidly, processes can become your biggest barrier in solving your customer’s immediate problems. Empathy means accepting that processes may still not be able to solve all your/your customer’s problems. Empathy also means accepting that processes cannot be rigidly applied to all situations.

What can you do about it?

  • Understand the situation in which processes are applied.
  • Understand the larger context.
  • Assess if processes can be applied in an “as-is” state or would it need some tweaking.
  • Learn from unique situations and improve processes to include those scenarios.

As a first step to your process improvement journey, even if you focus on these Three E’s, your journey will become much easier and fun

Quality #12: Middle Management and Quality Culture

by Tanmay Vora on November 24, 2009

Welcome to the final post in this 12-part series on QUALITY, titled #QUALITYtweet – 12 Ideas to Build a Quality Culture.

Here are the first eleven posts, in case you would like to go back and take a look:

  1. Quality #1: Quality is a long term differentiator
  2. Quality #2: Cure Precedes Prevention
  3. Quality #3: Great People + Good Processes = Great Quality
  4. Quality #4: Simplifying Processes
  5. Quality #5: Customers are your “Quality Partners”
  6. Quality #6: Knowing what needs improvement
  7. Quality #7: Productivity and Quality
  8. Quality #8: Best Practices are Contextual
  9. Quality #9: Quality of Relationship and Communication
  10. Quality #10: Inspection can be a waste if…
  11. Quality #11: Driving Change Through Leadership

#QUALITYtweet Middle management is the glue

joins long-term organizational goals with short-term

improvement actions.

Strategies for growth and improvement that take a shape in corporate boardrooms are implemented on the floor by people at all levels. Middle managers translate these larger goals and vision into actionable tasks that teams execute. Middle management of your organization plays a pivotal role in mobilizing people to execute tasks in line with larger goals and values.

Most “Quality Improvement” literature focuses on “commitment from the top”. That is the first step. I would also like to emphasize on “commitment from the middle management” because they are a very important link between the top and the bottom.

The primary focus of the top management should be on nurturing the middle layer of management, for they can make a huge difference in organization’s growth. They form the culture and set the tone and behavior for people who execute. A strong middle management means strong organization.

Typically, the role of middle managers in quality management is:

  • To ensure that all actions, tasks and behaviors are aligned to the broader vision and goals.
  • To build a strong customer oriented culture by setting right examples.
  • Not just to manage people, but truly lead them.
  • To have a strong business acumen to facilitate right decision-making
  • To be oriented to and driven by customer needs, hence building a customer-oriented culture.
  • To take accountability of culture-building and not always look at the top for directions.
  • To mobilize people to drive quality.
  • To involve people at all level in team in process improvement
  • To ensure right flow of information at all levels
  • To manage employee behaviors and focus on team effort to deliver quality

Top management should formally delegate responsibility of process improvement to a group or an individual. If quality improvement isn’t anybody’s job, it is not surprising that it doesn’t get done.

People look at their leaders as role models who are expected to be setting right examples. Middle management behavior and attitude ultimately ends up shaping the overall organization culture. If you want to get a pulse of an organization, just observe how middle managers communicate and the content of communication. With positive communication and motivation, employees can be truly engaged to the mission of the project and hence the organization. Quality of communication and leadership with internal customers (people) is as important as that with external customers.

Managers tell stories that people believe in and adopt. Challenge for people at the top is to ensure that middle managers tell right stories, which ultimately builds the right culture.

Keep your middle management focused, and rest of the culture building activity becomes much easier.

How much does your IQ matter?

by Vijay Peduru on July 17, 2009

eq_iceberg… apparently not that much! according to Daniel Goleman in his best selling book “Emotional Intelligence“; in which he says that success is 80% Emotional Intelligence (EQ) and 20% Intelligence Quotient (IQ).

Our success in life and business for the most part, depends on how we manage ourselves and our emotions rather than how much IQ we have… and how we manage our emotions depends upon our emotional stamina!

Think about it – When we are happy and joyful, we think clearly and solutions to our problems seem to flow effortlessly. When we are angry or upset , our whole mind and body is tensed and our thinking is clouded and we make weak choices for the future that we are trying to create.

For most people, coming out of bad emotions may take somewhere from five minutes to a few hours… some take days and some even longer! That makes sense, since each one of us is shaped differently through our experiences in the world. The problem is: Our life is wasted during the time we wobble in those bad emotions. To be highly effective most of the time, we have to learn to build our emotional stamina.

So, how does one build emotional stamina? I have a 2-step process that I’d like to share with you:

1.Become Aware of the emotions : When an emotion strikes us , we become one with it. Our whole mind is filled with that emotion and our body reacts accordingly. When we are angry, our mind is filled with the emotion we call “anger” and our body shakes. When we are happy, our mind is filled with the emotion we call “happiness” and our body is relaxed. With the knowledge that the posture our body automatically assumes is a result of the emotion we are “in”, we can begin our journey towards awareness towards our emotions. We begin with taking notice of our body… not do anything, just watch! For example, any stress in the body, contortions in our facial expression, clenching of teeth – all are tell tale signs of brewing anger. Give it a shot with this simple exercise (you can do sitting in the comfort of your home): Watch your emotions when you watch a movie. As soon as you feel you’re getting “into” the movie, pause it and reflect on your emotions. You will notice the different emotions that are produced in your body.

2.Handle the Emotions to work for you, not against you: Once we become aware of our emotions, then slowly, we can learn to change them. To change them, we have to know what emotions we need to change them to. When we are dejected, we can start being optimistic by remembering a quote or by starting to read an inspirational book. Like any other habit, this takes a while to master, but once mastered it increases our effectiveness in our business and in all other areas of our life.

Now that we know about the “EQ”, here’s an idea on how to use it: Once you become aware of your emotions and learn how to handle them to be in your favor, you can start noticing the emotions in others including your team members and can even change their emotions, so that not only you, you can even help your team be highly effective!

So, the next time someone tells you about how it is all about the IQ, gently remind them of the bigger chunk of the iceberg that floats under the water… hidden from common sight… called the EQ!

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