Posts Tagged ‘risks’

As the Paradigm Shifts #V: Vulnerability

by Rosie Kuhn on September 21, 2011

You must have seen it coming: after all of these weeks …

From the moment we are born we are vulnerable to – well, to everything. Very quickly, and as best we can we begin to tap into strategies that keep us invulnerable to starvation for nourishment and nurturing. We begin to calculate –developing strategic ways to get what we need and perhaps what we want. Our parents can tell a cry that means a diaper needs changing from a cry that says I’m hungry. We learn very quickly how to take care of the situation and minimize vulnerability.

As calculating as we can be, there comes a moment when we are whacked upside the head with the proverbial  2×4, which knocks us senseless and into an even more shrewd way of being in order to avoid any further vulnerability. We continually build on this until we’ve well established, what Tracy Goss calls, our winning strategy. She calls it a winning strategy because it keeps you winning at getting what you want, when you want; until it doesn’t. At some point it becomes clear that this winning strategy limits what’s possible and though you remain invulnerable, which seems like a good thing, you are unable to access what’s necessary to have what you say you want. The only way to shift this process is to willingly risk being vulnerable – only in service to what you say you want.

Remember earlier when I talked about that moment when you decided to be invulnerable? In that instant what occurred that had you make that decision was too painful and too challenging for a little kid to handle. As a kid you had no one to tell you that you are going to be okay. In that moment you were all alone and alone you made that choice to protect yourself at all cost.

At some point in each lifetime we are required to meet again that moment when we have to be willing to risk what we couldn’t risk as a child. We have to trade invulnerability for what we say we want. Now, being an adult, we’ve had plenty of experiences where we calculatingly traded our invulnerability for vulnerability. Trying out for various sports, asking someone for a date, applying to colleges and jobs, asking for a raise; each of these were instances where you chose vulnerability in order to get what you wanted. This is a very good thing and indicates you know how to stretch and strengthen the muscles required to take the risk. What has us be able to risk some times and not others, in other words what has us be more vulnerable in some circumstances while not in others?

In the world of business the majority of us are walking around limited by our winning strategies, remaining invulnerable. This keeps us safe, secure and stable but also most of the time unfulfilled. I’ve begun working with a new client, Patricia, who has phenomenal skills in her line of business but is scared to death to risk losing the stability she’s created, even though she is terribly miserable in her work. She is not alone. Approximately four out of five individuals feel the same way as Patricia.

When Patricia thinks about quitting her job and changing careers she feels like a tiny incapable human being. In that moment she’s calling up the young child to be vulnerable. Think about it for just a moment. We approach this moment of risk as if we were that young innocent child, not the grown up that has risked many times before and come up successful.

The evidence is stacked up in your favor that you will survive taking risks. At the same time you hold on to that one instance in your life when all was lost (because you were only a little kid and didn’t have the wisdom of a grownup to deal with the fallout). You were lost and not yet found. Yes, not yet found.

When what’s at stake is more important to you then the safety of the prison you’ve built through the practice of invulnerability you are, in that moment, given the opportunity to find yourself. Lost or left behind, you can re-member and reclaim any and all aspects of the you, you left behind. It is an exquisite reunion, one you’ll never forget.

Patricia knows that hiding out within the walls that protect her will never replace the feeling of fulfillment she knows exists outside. In this moment, while you are reading this, she is calculating what’s at stake and if it’s worth the risk.

Our business, the work we bring to the world, I believe to be the most crucial aspect of self-expression. And, I also believe that self-expression, in whatever form that takes, is essential to thriving. To empower yourself and others to step out beyond the walls that only seemingly keep you safe, you create an opening in the current reality for a paradigm shift. You have no idea the positive repercussion that follows such an act. Even the slightest movement in the direction of what you want, which requires risk and faith, will reward you with a sense of accomplishment that is in itself a beautiful remuneration. Give it a try – what have you got to lose?

There is great value in investing in a thinking partner for yourself or for those you want to empower. According to statistics, hiring a coach is crucial to growing yourself and your business. Reading pieces like this is a start, yet without action nothing changes.

Enjoy the adventure!

Project Reality Check #18: Humility

by Gary Monti on April 19, 2011

All the responsibility and none of the authority,” is the motto of project management, or so it seems. Can anything be done to improve the situation? Yes. If one goes back to 12th century Italy, sound advice was given by Francis of Assisi. The purpose of looking at Francis is to see what wisdom is present rather than espousing a particular religious view. With that disclaimer, let’s move on!

How Much CAN You Do?

I had a client once who demanded all sorts of things. He was pretty much over the top at the time. In exasperation I responded to his demands by simply asking, “If I could do all you are asking would we be sitting here having this conversation? No, I’d be so rich I wouldn’t know what to do with myself!” We had a good laugh.

Inside that tense, humorous situation is a core truth project manager’s need to address.  It has to do with humility, limits, and the generation of abundance.

How Are You With The Basics?

Francis of Assisi wondered what it meant to live a good life. Specifically, he was concerned about how it reflected in community. What he stated rings true to this day:

“First do what is necessary, then do what is possible, and you will awaken to doing the impossible.”

In project management terms he would be saying, “Stick with the nine areas of project management. Learn them well and practice them repeatedly in all project work. Beware of shortcuts. Keep things as simple as possible. By doing that something will be created which can be built upon.” He was talking about being humble and avoiding over-reaching.

Build a Mosaic

It goes further, though. When one gets the reputation of sticking to the knitting, being respectful and doing a good job consistently others who want to build are attracted to that person because they see something of substance being done. This is the payoff and the paradox of working humbly and staying within one’s limits. What do I mean?

A sense of being trustworthy develops. This leads to building a team. The positive energy present pushes the team to leverage its capabilities. The team can’t sit still! At this point a synergy sets in which leads to calculated risk taking. This is a foundation from which abundance develops. It is much like a mosaic. With a few basic shapes and colors plus the flow of ideas from the team awe-inspiring works can be created.

It is important to close with pointing out that being humble is different than being a wallflower or having false modesty. On the contrary, a humble person simply moves based on the principles present and really isn’t looking for approval nor trying to be rebellious. There is strength of character present adding to the attractiveness of the person. People want what they have. If they are willing to work on the team they have a shot at getting it. And the abundance continues to grow!

Quality #3: Great People + Good Processes = Great Quality

by Tanmay Vora on November 11, 2009

This is the third part of a 12-part series titled #QUALITYtweet – 12 Ideas to Build a Quality Culture.

Here are the first two posts, in case you would like to go back and take a look:

  1. Quality #1: Quality is a long term differentiator
  2. Quality #2: Cure Precedes Prevention

#QUALITYtweet No certification will

save the project if you staff it with

poor resources

Great quality is always a result of good people working passionately towards organizations goals. People can be your strongest (or weakest) link that has the strong influence in quality of your deliverable.

In the process improvement initiative, if due consideration is not given to the people aspect, processes manuals and specifications can easily give you a false confidence that everything will go as per the process. People form the core of any project because they write specifications, understand, design and develop your solutions.

I believe that organizations need good people to deliver quality – process acts as a catalyst to drive the success and manage risks. People are always the strongest or the weakest link in the success or failure of a project.

One of the key challenges for managers/leaders is to build a “quality aware” team where people know that quality is everybody’s responsibility.

For example, having a set of development guidelines or testing guidelines does not stop an individual from developing a bad product. Ability to develop a good product, associate it with business understanding and finding optimized ways of accomplishing things is an art – an intrinsic ability. Focus should be on people because they develop solutions with the help of a process (whether a formal or personal process).

Processes help you create a right management framework, manage risks, measure outcomes and take right decisions. Processes should act as a tool and help people perform better. Knowing the priorities, business model and having insight on what has really worked for you in the past is crucial to see that processes drive growth and not become an overhead.

Recipe for great quality is to have right people following right processes employing right tools at a right time.